An Interview with David Regal

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„The process is my favorite part“

David Regal is one of the most original and most prolific creators in our field, and I am a huge fan. He is also a super nice guy who graciously cut out some time from his current schedule of shooting the final episodes of “The Carbonaro Effect” to do this interview about inspiration, creating magic, and considering retirement.

Hi David! Ten years after Approaching Magic your new book, Interpreting Magic, is finally coming out. What has taken you so long? 🙂

It doesn’t seem like a long time to me. It was simply the amount of time it took to develop material, interview people from different places around the world, and write the book.

Besides format and weight, how are the two titles or their content related? Do we read them like a progression, culminating later maybe in Strengthening Magic or Selling Magic, or is it more about a shift in your focus?

You think there will be another book?! I can’t conceive of such a thing. I honestly can’t imagine trying to tackle it again. I do think that Approaching Magic and Interpreting Magic link insofar as both deal with ways to individualize the magic we do. Either can be read alone, though.

Has your magic somehow changed over the past years, and if so, does this show in the book?

I have matured, but I don’t mean that in the way of something I have accomplished by virtue of will, more like something that happened to me. Over the past ten years I’ve written or collaborated on literally hundreds of magic routines, for television and in theatrical venues. I’ve tried to pay attention and learn, and my observations and experiences are part of my current book… in addition to a lot of material.

That is indeed a lot! Besides presenting dozens of new tricks, you have conducted more than 30 interviews with many of magic’s top creators and performers, from Simon Aronson to Rob Zabrecky. With what intention and to what overall effect?

I feel that by looking at so many different people’s “way in” to magic and their process, the cumulative effect is both inspiring and welcoming.

What’s your own favorite approach to developing new material? Do you rather start from the effect, or the method, or with an interesting premise or prop?

There is no one way. It all comes down to “What if…?”

Many creative people will tell you that they have special moments and places where their next big idea is more likely to strike them, like during their morning shower or while walking the dog late at night. How about you?

I come from television writing, where one cannot choose to wait for inspiration. Inspiration is lovely, but my training has been on the battlefield of production demands. Your favorite TV show? The one that seems particularly funny or well-crafted? It was at one time writers in a room with a deadline!

If pressed, who’s your favorite creator in magic, and why?

I particularly like Al Baker, maybe because I was fortunate to be loaned an Al Baker book by a neighbor when I was too young to understand or appreciate it all. As I grew the book magically informed me in new ways.

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With six big books under your belt now, your magic output is amazingly huge, diverse, and original. What drives and inspires you to go on and on?

The process of putting things together, working out the puzzle of it all, appeals to me. The process is my favorite part. For a while I felt guilty about that. Only recently have I started to accept who I am and what I’m drawn to, but better late than never.

Definitely! You are obviously way too young to retire, but if there was only one accomplishment in magic you wanted to be remembered for, which one would it be?

I am not too young to retire, but I like to occasionally flatter myself by imagining that my new book might one day be looked back on as something that was good for magic. I realize that sounds egotistical, but why would anyone go to the effort of writing a book like this without hoping the same thing?

Right, who isn’t into writing also with a faint hope of leaving a worthy legacy… Final question, totally unrelated: Any chances of welcoming you in Germany, the land of The Mugs & Balls (beer and soccer!) and the home of the Flicking Fingers, in the future?

I’d love a trip to Germany!

Great, let’s hope our convention and tour bookers are listening! Thank you so much for your time, David, and best of success with Interpreting Magic!

(Interview: Jan Isenbart)


MORE REGAL:

Check out the full table of content of Interpreting Magic here (PDF) and his website and online shop here.

You will find a lengthy, glowing review of Interpreting Magic by Michael Close in this thread over at the Genii Forum. In addition, Michael offers a podcast interview with David on his website. You have to subscribe to his newsletter to catch it, but you won’t regret it!

In addition, here’s a recent podcast interview of David by Scott Wells from The Magic Word.

And finally, do yourself a favor and enjoy one of his shows from The Magic Castle, featuring Herman! (Spoiler alert: Watch out for the cheese!)


 

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Zabrecky’s Strange Cures

Rob Zabrecky is a mainstay of the Magic Castle and a fine magician with a well-defined stage persona that borders on the dark and bizarre. Before his magic career, he was a professional musician. Even though he has just turned 51, Zabrecky has recently published his autobiography, Strange Cures, subtitled “A memoir”. It’s available at Amazon now in a paperback edition for 19,95 Dollars.

From the blurb:

Strange Cures is a turbulent, against-all odds memoir of self-discovery, success, failure, and reinvention, told by one of LA’s most interesting natives. With an unflinching gaze, musician/magician/actor Zabrecky recounts his bizarre coming-of-age tale and his quest to find a place in the arts–and the world.

The author reveals a young life filled with both physical miracles and subversive role models, including an uncle who impersonated an FBI agent and, in a drunken delusion, shot and nearly killed him. He takes readers on a roller coaster ride through the nascent days of Silver Lake’s music and art community, as seen through the lens of his critically acclaimed band, Possum Dixon.

As Jim Steinmeyer, magic author, inventor and performer, comments:

Zabrecky’s memoirs are surprising, addictive, terrifying, magical. He careens through childhood, rock and roll, and popular entertainment by driving on the shoulder, passing on the right, and then playing bumper cars with the cold, hard truth. You’re in for a fantastic ride.

Here’s a nice review from the Los Angeles Times, and it ends with a great line:  The reader of Strange Cures is reminded “that life is what you make of it, and what you make of it is rarely what you dream it to be.”

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Addendum:

Here’s a free excerpt of the book from the LA Weekly. Enjoy!


 

The Multiplying Books

It’s springtime in Magic Bookie Land, new titles just keep popping up everywhere like mushrooms on a wet day!

Just about two weeks ago, Penguin Magic brought out Juan Tamariz‘s opus magnum, The Magic Rainbow. You may want to GET THIS NOW. Yes, it’s 149 Euro, but it has almost 600 pages and costs about what you paid for the last four or five “latest wonders” or overpriced one trick DVDs, so why worry? This one is likely to serve you a lifetime supply of brain food to understand magic better and to make you a much better performer.

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Last week, Dover published a Kindle edition of How to Make a Living as a Professional Magician: Business First, Sleight-of-Hand Later by Matt Patterson. It’s an updated version of his 1997 manual, Blood, Sweat, and Pinky Breaks, which I had been unaware of before. The price is 12,45 Euro.

Only today I noticed a revised and extended edition of JosePepe” Carroll‘s two volume modern card magic classic, 52 Lovers, now advertised as 52 Lovers Through the Looking-Glass over at Vanishing Inc. The price is 70 Dollars.

Vanishing Inc. have also just started a new line of booklets called Astonishing Essays, which are pigeon-holed somewhere between lecture notes and books. The first three out of ten booklets planned feature Steve Cohen, Rob Zabrecky and an unnamed Prison Magician (with a lifetime sentence).

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By the way, Steve Cohen also put out a fine graphic novel just recently, The Millionaires’ Magician. The price is 24,99 Dollar, and you can catch a full online preview here.

Oh, and not to forget our very own Pit Hartling, who has just republished his acclaimed first book, Card Fictions, and his more recent, but quickly-out-of-print mem deck oeuvre, In Order to Amaze. Prices are 35 and 52 Euro.

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Für unsere deutschsprachigen Zauberfreunde: Thorsten Havener hat ganz frisch ein neues Buch am Markt. Sag es keinem weiter: Warum wir Geheimnisse brauchen beginnt mit einer sehr berührenden, persönlichen Geschichte des Autors. Danch reitet er flott durch einen Wust von Gedanken und Anekdoten, Studienergebnissen und Info-Häppchen. Im Mittelteil dürften dann auch viele Zauberfreunde auf ihre Kosten kommen und manchem vertrauten Namen und Prinzip begegnen. Der Preis: 16 Euro.

Erdnase

Bei Amazon ist am 11. Februar Der Experte am Kartentisch von S.W Erdnase auf deutsch erschienen. Der Untertitel: “Wie Sie erfolgreich manipulieren und meisterhaft zaubern”. Nun ja. Ob es sich bei dieser Veröffentlichung des Nikol Verlages um die bekannte Übersetzung von Christian Scherer handelt, konnte ich noch nicht feststellen. Der Preis: 7,95 Euro.