The Horst Vegas Magic Chalk Talk (6): Tricks

Horst Vegas, self-proclaimed Senior Boy Wonder of Magic and an unfailing Lota Bowl of Wizzdom, shares another of his tinny-tiny Golden Showbiz Rules & Recommendations:

In these times of stimulus satiation, headline news and constant eye candy, we are well advised to re-evaluate our traditional tricks-per-minute ratio and to consider quickies rather than „slowies,“ visual magic rather than verbal, and multiple effects rather than one trick ponies as the new norm, exceptions granted.

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Vanishing Julian Assange

Let’s not get too political here. Let’s simply state that WikiLeaks frontman Julian Assange has been living and hiding in the Ecuadorian embassy in London for more than three and a half years now (!) in order to avoid being arrested by British authorities and, subsequently, turned over to Swedish or U.S. authorities. His future path is uncharted and most likely stony.

Now, if you were an illusionist like David Copperfield or Franz Harary and called in for help, how would you make him disappear from the embassy without his guardians, his persecutors, and the press bloodhounds noticing in due time?

Having just watched several old TV specials by Copperfield and the late great Paul Daniels, I would have an idea or two. (O.K., Jim Steinmeyer would probably come up with 27 solutions at once.)

If someone were to pull this off – can you imagine the hoot and the headlines?!

This is not your grandfather’s egg bag trick. This is not the latest poor poo-poo card move. This is truly magic with a meaning!

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The Horst Vegas Magic Chalk Talk (4): Dealers’ Tricks

Horst Vegas, self-proclaimed Senior Boy Wonder of Magic and an unfailing Lota Bowl of Wizzdom, shares another of his tinny-tiny Golden Showbiz Rules & Recommendations:

In the world of magic dealers‘ tricks, there are mules and donkeys, show horses, work horses, and race horses. If you ever come across something beyond a show horse, I’d be interested to hear about it.


Establishing Meta Magic

I’m sure you have already come across some of the following phenomena in your magic life. But I’m not sure though whether there is a name for these. For the lack of a better term, I will call this thing meta magic.

In a nutshell, meta magic is magic about itself, within itself or out of itself (if there is a difference). A deception within the deception. Tricks of meta magic quality are utterly self-referential. For that, they may constitute bad magic from a layman’s point-of-view, but they may be inherently funny and stimulating for majishuns.

Here are some striking examples of meta magic I could think of:

  • Doing a “torn and restored” trick with an instruction sheet that explains a “torn and restored” trick
  • Showing a card trick in which a magician drawn on a blank card finds the chosen card
  • Letting a burning cigarette disappear in a cloud of cigarette smoke
  • Floating a Zombie ball or Losander table while floating yourself
  • Sawing a woman in half while she is performing Disecto on you
  • Pulling a small square circle illusion out of a bigger square circle that was pulled out of a huge square circle
  • Changing a change bag into another change bag by using, umm, a square circle illusion.

I guess there is a lot more meta magic out there!


The Horst Vegas Magic Chalk Talk (3): Women in Magic

Horst Vegas, self-proclaimed Senior Boy Wonder of Magic and an unfailing Lota Bowl of Wizzdom, shares another of his tinny-tiny Golden Showbiz Rules & Recommendations:

I feel that women would be better off in magic with their own organization. How about founding the International BroMotherhood of MaBragicianennes?


Ever Noticed? (3)

Ever noticed? “Invisible Thread” is the greatest marketing ploy ever invented in magic. At least on a well-lit stage. Duh!

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Ever noticed? “Password” and “123456” are among the most widely used passwords in the world. And we do expect strangers to remember a playing card for two minutes? Really?

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Ever noticed? Even mentalists seem unable to predict the publishing dates of their forthcoming books correctly.