Die Stiftung Zauberkunst lädt ein

StiftZK

Ein Update von Uwe Schenk und Michael Sondermeyer:

Einladung zum Stiftungstag am 16.11.19

Am 3. November 2018 wurde die Stiftung Zauberkunst im Zentrum für Zauberkunst in Appelhülsen gegründet. Ein Jahr später möchten wir interessierte, engagierte, neugierige und kritische Menschen einladen, mit uns über die weitere Entwicklung und die Zukunft der Stiftung zu beraten. Dazu laden wir am 16.11.19 zu unserem ersten Stiftungstag ein.

Der Stiftungstag wird am Samstag, dem 16.11.19 stattfinden. Da viele Teilnehmer eine weite Anreise haben werden, gibt es die Möglichkeit, schon ab Freitag Nachmittag ins Zentrum für Zauberkunst zu kommen, und auch am Sonntag Vormittag ist das Zentrum geöffnet.

Ob und wie diese Zeiten schon für Gespräche, Arbeitsgruppen oder noch für die Vorbereitung genutzt werden, entscheidet jeder selbst. Wir gehen davon aus, dass viele Teilnehmer schon früher anreisen, so dass sich auf jeden Fall die Gelegenheit zum Austausch und dem Zusammensein mit Zauberfreunden ergibt.

Am Samstag wird es zum Einstieg einen kurzen Bericht über das erste Jahr der Stiftung geben. Danach soll in Kleingruppen an verschiedenen Themen gearbeitet werden, die für die Zukunft der Stiftung von Bedeutung sind. Zurzeit sind AGs zu folgenden Themen geplant:

  • Ist Zaubern Kunst?
  • Ideen zur Ausbildung von Zauberkünstlern
  • Inventarisierung und Dokumentation der Sammlung
  • Finanzierung der Stiftung (u.a. der Förderverein)
  • Räumlichkeiten der Stiftung
  • Mögliche weitere Aufgaben und Tätigkeiten der Stiftung

Die Liste kann gerne um weitere interessante Fragestellungen erweitert werden.

Wir freuen uns über jeden, der sich an diesen Diskussionen beteiligen möchte. Die Stiftungsgründung hatte ja vor allem den Zweck, eine Zukunft für die Sammlung und das Dokumentationszentrum zu ermöglichen – losgelöst von unseren Personen. Von daher wünschen wir uns eine möglichst große Beteiligung an den weiteren Planungen … und dann auch an deren Umsetzungen.

Wir hoffen auf viele Teilnehmer und Teilnehmerinnen und freuen uns auf einen anregenden und spannenden Tag!

Michael Sondermeyer und Uwe Schenk

Auf der Website zum Stiftungstag gibt es weitere Informationen zur Organisation, zu den Themen und die Möglichkeit zur Anmeldung.
Ich bin dabei!

Advertisements

An Interview with Hans Klok

Hans Klok
“There’s no place like Vegas in the world”

 

Hi, Hans! About six weeks into your new show at the Excalibur in Las Vegas, how has it been going so far? Has the show already been worked in well?

Hans Klok: We are definitely proud of the show we are performing here. We took enough time to produce it already in Europe, and the results are extremely rewarding. It is running smoothly and the reviews are fantastic. It was my dream for many years to come back here to Las Vegas and we are settling down very well.

On Instagram you have already posted a number of photos with magic and other celebrities… So how have you been received by the magic community on your return to Vegas?

I have always felt very welcome by the magic community here in Vegas, especially by Siegfried & Roy, who have always been my great inspiration. They have been to our show recently and were very enthusiastic and excited for me, as was my dear friend Criss Angel when he was here. Lance Burton has also been a good friend of mine for many years and it was fabulous for us to catch up again.

Who is your main audience, and how are the fill rates of the showroom doing?

We are having great response from audiences from all over the world. Las Vegas is obviously a huge tourist magnet for all nationalities. We are filling the room nicely with a multitude of international visitors, but on saying that, our main audience still seems to be Americans, people from Germany and of course the Dutch.

You deliver about 50 illusions in 70 minutes, which is an amazing feat. So what‘s your smallest trick in the show, and what‘s your biggest illusion?

The smallest trick is the Floating Light Bulb, which has a gigantic effect on the audience. I am proud to have the permission from the Blackstone Family to be the only illusionist today who is allowed to perform this miracle world-wide.

I guess the largest illusion is the Eclipse, in which I produce three lovely assistants from nowhere. And I really love the Suspended Animation from John Taylor, which is one of the best illusions created in the last 20 years.

At age 50 now, is it getting harder to stay „the fastest magician in the world?“ How do you maintain your fitness level outside of the show?

If you are passionate enough about anything that you do, you can remain at the top of your profession for as long as this passion drives you. When I am performing, I feel ageless. So I guess that being the fastest magician in the world is still going to be my label for a long time. And going to the gym every day and swimming a few laps in my pool every evening helps as well.

KlokBillb
Instagram screenshot from Hans Klok a few days before his premiere in Las Vegas

You have three sentences for a good pitch. Why should families visit your show, and why should magicians also take notice?

To sum it up in one sentence: Apart from my performance being a tornado of illusions, this show is also a tribute to some of the greatest magicians and illusionists of all time, so the audience get to re-live such great moments through the history of magic, for example the mysterious Floating Light Bulb from Harry Blackstone and not to forget the fabulous Moretti Sword Box.

In a recent portrait of yours in de Volkskrant you said that, on the one hand, everything in Vegas is „fake and plastics,“ on the other hand it feels very much like a special place for you. Why is that?

Hey, that’s Las Vegas. There is no place like this in the world!

Heel erg bedankt for taking the time to answer my questions, und weiterhin alles Gute, Hans!

(Interview: Jan Isenbart)


Watch the TV trailer for the new show here:

Visit Hans Klok’s website and get tickets for his show at the Excalibur Hotel & Casino (starting at 44,95 $) here.

Read more interviews with magic celebrities in English and German on ZZZAUBER  here.


 

The Definite German Magic Bibliography

A moment of silent awe and admiration, please.

40 years in the making, here it finally is: THE Bibliography of German magic books and other publications until 1945, Almost 700 pages, more than 3,000 entries, thorough, and heavy as hell!

Big kudos to Volker Huber and Christian Theiß for making this happen!

I have already started to identify the exact editions of some books in my collection. Can’t wait to dig in deeper on the weekend!

Biblio2

The first edition of this masterpiece is limited to 300 copies. You may want to check it out here.


 

An Interview with Alexx Alexxander

AlexxPortr
“Everything was an obstacle with this illusion”

 

Congratulations on that Vanishing and Reappearing Lake Illusion, Alexx! Did you come up with the idea yourself, or who inspired you?

Alexx Alexxander: Yes I actually did, but the entire project was a collaboration with the City of Oslo. They were hosting a celebration as they were appointed “European Green Capital 2019”. In that regard they came to me and asked me if I could make an impossible and new illusion that had never been done before. I said I could, and that was when the idea of using water came along. Water is a necessary ressource for us, and in Oslo there is only one source for water, Lake Maridal. So I decided to attempt something that was never done before by any magician in the world: to make the great Lake Maridal disappear.

How long did it take to develop the concept from idea to performance?

Just over a year we worked on it to be able to do it. We actually had to come up with a brand new concept in magic to be able to pull it off. We couldn’t use old principles. It didn’t work. It was a challenging illusion as I wanted to have a live audience present when we did it. Another challenge was to find the right location. The production looks small and easy, but it was really not. There were so many people involved in this, and the production time took forever. And we used months just for testing. My own crew worked around the clock.

We hear that the late Don Wayne was consulting on this…

Yes, that’s right. He and I have been working together for years. He has helped out with ideas for my live show and he has made unique illusions for me. The first big scale illusion we did together was the disappearance of a gas station.

On the lake illusion, when we figured out just how to be able to do the illusion, Don made the drawings on how we had to build what was required. We also worked with the brilliant Tim Tønnessen whom I’ve been working with for many years. He was the person who figured out the new principle that we used. He has a clever mind, and has also known Don for years. We made a really good team.

AlexxA

What were the reactions of the media and of the magic community in Norway on this illusion?

The reactions were amazing. All of the Norwegian press covered it, and the City of Oslo made an event on the 16th of June where we released the illusion to the public for the first time. It was a great sight of thousands of people that came to witness it. There were more people than they expected, it was a completely full venue.

Everywhere I go now, people come up to me and talk about this illusion. Everyone has heard about it or seen it in the papers or on TV.

Can you share what the main obstacles were in making this trick happen?

Everything was an obstacle with this illusion! We tried all principles of magic, but none of them worked. The lake is so big and in constant movement, and everywhere around there’s forest with trees and branches that move in the wind. And here in Norway the weather can be a challenge, and it really was during this. We had so much wind, rain and just impossible working conditions.

We had to do everything secretly so that no one would figure out what I was attempting. The City of Oslo was very helpful with everything we needed. My vision was to do it live, but because of the weather challenges we had to film it a couple of days before and launch it on the 16th of June. But I got a standing ovation for it at the event, so I’m very pleased.

AlexxMotorbike

What’s next on your agenda?

This autumn I’m touring Norway with my grand illusion show. I’m also traveling to Las Vegas for an exciting event during the tour. Next year I’m filming my own TV-special and taking my show abroad. A year ago, I performed in Mumbai, India. I’m also going back there. Very excited about that. Hopefully I will also come to more countries in Europe soon!

Thank you, Alexx, and good luck for your upcoming ventures!

(Interview: Jan Isenbart)

<<>>>

Find more news on Alexx, his tour schedule and projects here.

See the video of Lake Maridal here:

And here’s the discussion of this illusion and similar ones or its predecessors over at the Genii Forum.


 

Im Interview: Pit Hartling

_F2A1062
„Ich liebe vor allem die Abwechslung“

 

Hallo Pit! Um meiner journalistischen Sorgfaltspflicht nachzukommen, möchte ich nach Thomas Fraps natürlich gerne noch weitere Fertige Finger zu ihren aktuellen Befindlichkeiten und zur Wahrnehmung ihres 25. Jubiläums befragen. Wie hast du dich denn dabei gefühlt?

Pit Hartling: Während des Finales im Theater Die Drehleier in München, zusammen mit Helge, Thomas, Jörg Alexander, Ben, Niko, Guido, Gaston und den anderen Gästen an diesem Abend, überkam mich eine kleine Welle nostalgischer Freude! Es ist sehr schön, nach 25 Jahren noch immer – oder zumindest wieder einmal – gemeinsam mit den Jungs auf der Bühne zu stehen. Ich habe das als einen ganz besonderen, kleinen Glücksmoment sehr genossen.

Was macht die Zahl 25 mit dir? Auch FISM Yokohama dürfte jetzt schon 25 Jahre her sein…

Ja, es ist verrückt! Da macht man einfach in aller Ruhe sein Ding, und – zack! – sind 25 Jahre rum! Vor allem fällt es mir auf, wenn ich mir anschaue, was die 16- und 17-Jährigen heute mit Spielkarten machen. Da schlackert man ja zum Teil mit den Ohren!

Wie und wo kannst du dir denn das Jubiläum “50 Jahre Gichtige Griffel Fertige Finger” vorstellen?

Haha, das planen wir dann, wenn es soweit ist, aber grundsätzlich hat man ja im Alter, was Comedy angeht, ganz andere Möglichkeiten! So manches, was von einem jungen Menschen ganz amüsant wäre, kann von einem altem sehr viel witziger sein. Ich habe neulich ein großartiges Foto gesehen, auf dem Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner und Dick van Dyke mit weit über 80 gemeinsam Grimassen schneiden – das finde ich schon eine ziemlich gute Zielvorgabe.

Wenn Thomas der “Zeigefinger” der Finger ist, welcher bist dann du? Der kleine Finger, der Linking-Ring-Finger oder der…?

Die Bezeichnung “Kleiner Finger” fiel tatsächlich das eine oder andere Mal. Aber das ist schon ok, zumindest bin ich nicht der Mittelfinger – das ist Guido!

Da zwei Fälle in der Boulevardpresse ja schon ein Trend und drei eine Massenbewegung sind, würde ich gerne mindestens noch einen weiteren Finger befragen. Du darfst bestimmen, wer das sein soll (Instant Stooging: Helge! Helge! Helge!) – und welche Frage ich ihm unbedingt stellen muss!

Klar, Helge! Frag ihn bitte, wann es denn jetzt endlich mit unserer großen Vegas-Tour losgeht, viel Zeit haben wir nicht mehr!

Prima, geht klar! Wahrscheinlich ist er gerade wieder in der Bredouille unterwegs. Aber was macht eigentlich Heinz, der kleine Schwerenöter? Er müsste ja so langsam mal in die Pubertät kommen…

Du, es ist ganz seltsam, aber im Gegensatz zu mir scheint Heinz kaum zu altern!? Vermutlich eine Stoffwechselsache. Andererseits war er halt auch immer schon ziemlich altklug, der kleine Scheißer.

Neben den Fertigen Fingern bist du ja auch Mitglied anderer langlebiger Kollektive, wie der Magic Monday Show im Kabarett „Die Schmiere“ oder beim Zauber-Dinner in Frankfurt. Welche Bedeutung haben diese für dich – ewiges Jugendlager, ruhiger Heimathafen oder kreative Testbühne?

Ich liebe vor allem die Abwechslung! So sehr ich es genieße, solo unterwegs zu sein, so sehr freue ich mich auch immer auf unsere Magic Mondays – die Show geht jetzt auch ins 20. Jahr – oder auch das „Metamagicum“ mit Thomas Fraps, immerhin seit 15 Jahren. Am ehesten kreative Testbühne sind für mich unsere Zauber-Dinner auf dem Schiff, vor allem, weil wir dort das Publikum in drei Gruppen aufteilen. Damit hat man dort die Gelegenheit, neue Nummern gleich drei Mal am Abend zu spielen – sehr, sehr nützlich!

Vor vier Jahren waren Denis Behr und du die deutschen Mitbegründer des internationalen Kollektivs Half Half Man. Nach einem sehr ambitionierten Start mit ausgewählten Produkten und hochwertigen Publikationen ist es dann bald ruhiger geworden. Lebt das Projekt noch?

Das scheint für viele so gewirkt zu haben, aber tatsächlich kann von „Mitbegründern“ oder gar „Kollektiv“ keine Rede sein. Helder (Guimarães) hatte einfach sowohl Denis als auch mich wegen einer Kolumne für eine neue, geplante Zeitschrift gefragt. Einzeln hatten wir beide keine Lust, aber wir schlugen ihm vor, gemeinsam etwas zu machen, in Dialogform. Unsere einzige Bitte war „carte blanche“, sprich, wir wollten einfach über alles reden bzw. schreiben können, wonach uns gerade der Sinn stand. Und so haben wir es dann gemacht. Irgendwann schlief das Ganze ein. Und irgendwo muss noch unsere letzte, bisher unveröffentlichte Kolumne herumliegen.

_F2A1373

Schade drum! Kommen wir endlich zu den Kartensachen. In einem Podcast-Interview mit dir habe ich neulich gehört, dass 80 Prozent deines Broterwerbs tatsächlich Stand-up-Auftritte sind. Heißt das, du zauberst mit Karten eigentlich mehr für andere Zauberer als für Laien?

Karten kommen bei mir im professionellen Bereich vor allem bei formellen Close-up-Shows zum Einsatz, meinem sogenannten „Magic Circle“. Wann immer ich Anfragen für kleine Gruppen bis zu maximal 50 Personen habe, schlage ich dieses Format vor: Die Gäste sind in einem engem Kreis dicht um einen runden Tisch herum versammelt, dazu ein grüner Casino-Filz und zwei Scheinwerfer. Diese Situation mag ich sehr, und dort ist es auch, wo ich zum Beispiel Kunststücke aus Card Fictions und In Order to Amaze hauptsächlich vorführe.

Dazu noch der eine oder andere „normale“ Close-up-Auftritt, aber ansonsten gibt es Spielkarten bei mir in der Tat mehr auf Kongressen, bei Seminaren und Workshops, das stimmt. Und natürlich öffentlich, bei meinen sogenannten „Magischen Soiréen“ im Grandhotel Hessischer Hof hier in Frankfurt oder bei Close-up-Gastspielen in Spielorten wie Stephan Kirschbaums Wundermanufaktur, bei Jan Logemann im Magiculum in Hamburg, der Close-up Lounge Hannover etc.

Dein lange vergriffenes erstes Buch Card Fictions ist inzwischen ja wieder erhältlich. Die Liste deiner Veröffentlichungen ist im Vergleich zu einigen anderen Kartenprofis eher schmal, aber dafür werden deine praktisch durch die Bank weg hoch gelobt ob ihrer Originalität und Perfektion. Wie intensiv verfolgst du und wie bewertest du denn den fast täglichen Auswurf der heutigen Zauberindustrie mit Tricks, Decks, Moves, Gimmicks und Instant Downloads?

Ich muss gestehen, dass ich diesen „Markt“ fast gar nicht verfolge. Allein bei der Menge an Buchveröffentlichungen halte ich mich an das Motto „Mut zur Lücke“. Das ist allerdings weniger irgendeiner Skepsis geschuldet, als vielmehr ganz profanem Zeitmangel. Ich bin sicher, dass mir dabei auch viele tolle Ideen und Entwicklungen entgehen, und ich versuche gerade in den letzten Jahren, da wieder etwas genauer hinzuschauen.

Was würdest du sagen: Auf welche deiner eigenen Trickschöpfungen bist du am meisten stolz?

Stolz empfinde ich in diesem Zusammenhang eigentlich kaum. Man kann ja nichts dafür, dass einem etwas einfällt. Stolz bin ich, wenn ich zu Hause ausgemistet habe oder zehn Kilometer joggen war! Aber was die Kartensache angeht: Zu den „Dauerbrennern“ in meinem Repertoire gehören sicher „Amor“, „Feurio“, „Finger Flicker“, die O-Saft Gedächtnisdemo oder die Pokerformeln.

Aber manchmal habe ich auch gerade Lust auf ganz andere Sachen. Das liebste „Baby“ ist ja sowieso immer das aktuelle Projekt, aber was dann den Test der Zeit besteht und gewissermaßen „überdauert“, das weiß man ja ohnehin immer erst nachher.

Gibt es neben dem memorierten Spiel noch ein besonderes Karten-Steckenpferd für dich, also zum Beispiel Story-Tricks, Gambling-Routinen oder Gimmick-Karten?

Nicht wirklich, nein. Methoden sind ja nur Werkzeuge. Sie sind Mittel zum Zweck, und der Zweck ist der Effekt. Und was Effekte angeht, mag ich in einer Show eine gewisse Abwechslung: Mal eine Skill-Demo, mal ein mehr „unmöglichkeitsbetontes“ Kunststück, mal etwas sehr Lustiges, etwas zum Thema Casino und Gambling, mal ein leiser, langsamer Rhythmus, dann wieder schnell und interaktiv. Ob dabei ein gemischtes Spiel zum Einsatz kommt oder ein Memospiel, Psychologie, Mathematik oder Gimmicks oder eine Kombination aus allem, ist für die Wirkung und das Publikum erstmal kein Kriterium.

Pit Hartling FU

Noch ein ganz anderes Thema, passend zu den meisten meiner anderen aktuellen Interviews: Du warst bereits im letzten Jahr zu Gast bei „Penn & Teller: Fool Us“, mit einer ganz starken Kartenroutine. Wie hast du die Show und die Gastgeber erlebt, und wie enttäuschst warst du womöglich, dass es nicht zu einer begehrten F.U.-Trophäe gereicht hat?

„Fool Us“ war eine rundum schöne Erfahrung! Die Produzenten hatten mich im Jahr davor schon einmal angefragt. Da ich aber zu diesem Zeitpunkt das Format nicht sehr gut kannte, hatte ich abgesagt. Ich glaubte zu wissen, dass es um eine Art Wettbewerb geht: Wenn du uns täuschst, hast du gewonnen, wenn nicht, haben wir gewonnen. Das fand ich die denkbar schlechteste Haltung für Zauberei.

Erst danach habe ich mitbekommen, dass das einfach eine kleine Mogelpackung von Penn und Teller ist, um zur besten Sendezeit gute Zauberei ins Fernsehen zu bringen. Das „Foolen“ oder nicht ist eher ein schönes Schmankerl, so dass sich eine größere Enttäuschung dort, glaube ich, wirklich für niemanden einstellt. Im Gegenteil: Es ist eine Freude zu erleben, wie dort alle an einem Strang ziehen, um möglichst gute Ergebnisse zu erzielen. In meiner Vorführung waren zum Beispiel diverse Kleinigkeiten daneben gegangen, so dass ich ein wenig improvisieren musste. Der Effekt und der Gesamt-Rhythmus waren davon zum Glück nicht groß betroffen, und die kleinen „Slalom“-Schlenker, die ich machen musste, wurden im Schnitt bereinigt.

Dabei ist das Konzept durchaus echt und ehrlich: Penn und Teller erfahren erst in dem Moment, wer ihnen da vorgesetzt wird, wenn man auf die Bühne tritt, und sie haben tatsächlich keinerlei Ahnung, was sie zu sehen bekommen werden. Ihre „Beratungen“ dauern live sehr viel länger, als am Ende zu sehen ist, aber ein Großteil dieser Zeit verwenden sie nicht um zu überlegen, wie die Methode war – das kennt man ja selbst: Entweder man ist getäuscht oder nicht -, sondern um die Texte für ihre „codierten“, verklausulierten Kommentare zu schreiben.

Überhaupt ist die ganze Sendung ein Kraftakt: Die Produktion geht über zwei Wochen, es sind ca. 200 Personen beteiligt, und an sechs Drehtagen werden 64 Acts aufgezeichnet plus 13 Penn & Teller-Nummern! Und dabei sind alle noch gut gelaunt und professionell. Sehr beeindruckend!

Mit einem Jahr Abstand — was hat dir dieser Auftritt persönlich, künstlerisch oder auch geschäftlich an Mehrwert gebracht? Und würdest du es wieder tun?

Handwerklich vor allem zwei Dinge: Die Erfahrung, wie es logistisch bei einer TV-Produktion dieser Art zugeht. Und die Erkenntnis, wie man Darbietungen für den Bildschirm „verknappt“ und auf den Punkt bringt. TV hat andere Gesetze als die Bühne.

Geschäftlich: Nix. Zwar meldeten sich die Produzenten von „America’s Got Talent“, aber die melden sich glaube ich bei jedem, und im Gegensatz zu „Fool Us“ weht da ein ganz anderer Wind. Vielleicht hätte man den Auftritt pressemäßig etwas ausschlachten können, aber das habe ich vergessen oder war zu faul!?

Wieder tun: Eindeutig ja. Das hat großen Spaß gemacht!

Schenkst du uns zum Abschluss bitte noch eine magische Weisheit oder ein Kurzgedicht des Lebemanns, Fußgängers und Kleinillusionisten Heinz?

Na, dann doch gerne beides:

Die große Weisheit (die nur so trivial klingt): Die wichtigste Fähigkeit für einen Zauberkünstler ist, die Dinge aus der Sicht der Zuschauer zu sehen.

Und, anlässlich der aktuellen tropischen Temperaturen, hier ein Zweizeiler zum Thema „Air Condition“: „Die Kühlanlage tat ihn stör’n. Er konnt’ die schon nicht mehr hör’n.“

Ich verrate aber nicht, was von mir und was von Heinz ist!

Großartig, ich glaube, das wird auch nicht nötig sein! Doppelten Dank, Pit und Heinz, für diese Perlen und all die persönlichen Einblicke, und euch weiterhin alles Gute!

(Interview: Jan Isenbart)


Hier geht es zur Website von Pit Hartling.

Hier ist Pit in einem recht aktuellen Podcast-Interview bei Vanishing Inc. zu hören.

Und hier sein letztjähriger Auftritt bei “Penn & Teller: Fool Us”:


 

Boretti feiert den 800sten!

Boretti 800

An dieser Stelle einen herzlichen Glückwunsch an Boretti zu einer weiteren stattlich großen Zahl!

800 Ausgaben von seinem wöchentlichen “Wort zum Sonntag” mit stets interessanten News, Links und Diskussionen – das ist eine unglaubliche Leistung und Ausdruck beneidenswerter Ausdauer und Leidenschaft.

Chapeau und gerne weiter so!


 

Im Interview: Wolfgang Moser

WM Teekessel Q

“Jeder Teilnehmer gewinnt durch den Auftritt in der Show”

 

Herzlichen Glückwunsch, Wolfgang, zu deinem gelungenen Auftritt bei Penn & Teller! Hand aufs Herz: Hast du damit gerechnet, die beiden „foolen“ zu können? Und wie bewertest du selbst deine Erfahrung mit der Show?

Wolfgang Moser: Ich denke, das mit dem „Foolen“ ist wirklich sehr schwer vorherzusagen, denn das hängt von so vielen Faktoren ab, auf die man keinen Einfluss hat. Manchmal reicht es, wenn die beiden nur eine Kleinigkeit übersehen. Oder man hat vielleicht Glück und sie (er)kennen die Methode ganz einfach nicht. Es ist also immer auch etwas Glück im Spiel. Zwar ist Teller ganz eindeutig das Zaubergenie der beiden, aber auch Penn ist verdammt schlau und weiß natürlich sehr viel. Tatsächlich haben die beiden sich – was man im Fernsehen natürlich nicht sieht – eine Viertelstunde lang beraten. Und Teller hat mir hinterher gesteckt, dass ich beide zwar einzeln gefoolt hatte, sie dann aber im Austausch miteinander doch noch zur richtigen Lösung kamen. Es war also recht knapp! Auch wenn ich die beiden letztlich nicht täuschen konnte, war die Show für mich also eine zu 100% positive Erfahrung.

Wie kam es denn zu deinem Auftritt?

Ich hatte mich schon vor Jahren mal bei der Show beworben, wurde aber vertröstet und habe seitdem nichts mehr gehört. Ich hatte mich also schon damit abgefunden, dass mein Act wohl nicht in das Showkonzept passen würde. Umso mehr war ich überrascht, als dann plötzlich sehr kurzfristig die Anfrage kam, ob ich in wenigen Wochen Zeit für die Aufzeichnung in Las Vegas haben würde.

Stand für dich von Anfang an fest, deine Version des Teekessels zu zeigen?

Ich denke, hier hat man als Teilnehmer der Show zwei Möglichkeiten. Entweder man tritt dort mit dem Ziel an zu „foolen“. Viele Teilnehmer entwickeln ja auch eigene Routinen speziell für die Show – Tricks mit mehreren potenziellen Lösungen, falschen Fährten, labyrinthischen Methoden usw. Gerade Kartentricks täuschen deshalb sehr häufig. Das Ergebnis ist dann aber oft eine Darbietung, die zwar „foolt“, aber wenig bleibenden Eindruck beim Publikum hinterlässt.

Andere Teilnehmer nutzen die Show, um einen eingespielten Act vor einem großen TV-Publikum präsentieren zu können. Schließlich gewinnt jeder Teilnehmer schon durch den Auftritt in der Show. Das Täuschen von Penn & Teller ist dann nur ein Sahnehäubchen oben drauf, ein Aufhänger um sehr gute Zauber-Acts zu präsentieren und der gesamten Show etwas mehr Spannung zu verleihen. Mein Fokus lag also darauf mich gut zu präsentieren. Da ich mit dem Trick aber auch schon viele sehr namhafte Zauberer auf der ganzen Welt täuschen konnte, war der Teekessel bestimmt in beiderlei Hinsicht die gute Wahl.

Wie hast du dich speziell auf diesen Auftritt vorbereitet? Und was hast du an deiner Routine ggf. verändert?

Ich hatte die Nummer ja schon für die FISM 2015 auf Englisch ausgearbeitet. Und ich zeige den Teekessel auch immer wieder in Galashows, Kongressen usw. auf Englisch. An der Methode habe ich so gut wie nichts verändert um den Trick unerklärlicher zu machen. Im Gegenteil, ich musste die Nummer fast um die Hälfte kürzen, da jeder Teilnehmer maximal fünf Minuten Zeit hat. Das war eigentlich für mich die größte Herausforderung, da ich den Ablauf der Routine selbst nicht verändert kann.

Und wie wurdest du vor Ort beraten?

Vor der Show präsentiert man die Nummer erst mal den Produzenten, vor der Aufzeichnung gibt es dann noch eine Generalprobe mit dem gesamten Team. Mit dabei ist immer Michael Close, der sich um die tricktechnischen Aspekte kümmert. Aber auch die Produzenten bringen sich mit wertvollen Tipps und Vorschlägen ein. Ein Tipp eines Produzenten war etwa, sich nicht mit Penn auf eine Diskussion einzulassen, die würde man nämlich garantiert verlieren… Im Ganzen war der Umgang mit den Künstlern wirklich sehr positiv.

Die Aufzeichnung der Sendung ist ja nun schon einige Monate her. Wie schwer war es, nicht darüber sprechen zu dürfen?

Ach, das macht mir gar nichts aus. Im Gegenteil. Wenn ich die Show dann ein halbes Jahr später sehe, kann ich mich ja selber davon überraschen lassen.

Wie geht es nun weiter? Willst du dich vielleicht nochmal der Herausforderung stellen?

Wie gesagt, „Penn & Teller: Fool Us“ war ein tolles Abenteuer, das mir sehr viel Spaß gemacht hat. Wenn ich die Gelegenheit noch einmal bekomme, würde ich also bestimmt nicht lange überlegen.

Welche wichtige Erkenntnis und welchen besonders schönen Eindruck nimmst du von der Show aus Las Vegas mit nach Hause?

Vor allem wurde meine Erkenntnis bestärkt, wie großartig die Arbeit von Penn & Teller ist. Die beiden präsentieren, wie unterhaltsam, faszinierend und clever Zauberei sein kann, in einer Show, die auf der ganzen Welt gesehen wird. Das hilft der Zauberei, ihr verstaubtes Image abzulegen.

Als besonderen Eindruck nehme ich das Treffen mit den beiden nach der Show mit. Teller nahm sich kurz Zeit um mir zu sagen, wie sehr ihm mein Trick gefallen hat. Und das war für mich mehr wert als jeder Preis.

Vielen Dank für das Gespräch, Wolfgang, und weiterhin viel Erfolg!

(Interview: Jan Isenbart)

WM PT FoolUs
Wolfgang Moser nach der Show mit Penn & Teller

Und hier der Auftritt von Wolfgang:


Zu Wolfgang Mosers Webseite geht es hier.

Weitere Interviews, u.a. mit den deutschen “Fool Us”-Kandidaten Harry Keaton und Axel Hecklau, gibt es hier.


 

Some Collected Impressions from the 8th EMHC in Vienna

EMHC Vienna 2019 Head

Traveling back now from Vienna on Sunday evening, the 8th edition of the European Magic History Conference is already (very recent) history. I am more than happy to have made the trip and to have attended for the first time!

My head is spinning with interesting facts and insights from a total of 16 lectures; I have met a few familiar faces and made many new acquaintances; my magic collection has grown through a few pieces I was able to acquire; my own presentation found some kind interest; and a couple of exciting new books are about to appear!

Overall, rubbing shoulders with some of magic‘s greatest historians / collectors / luminaries like Edwin Dawes, John Gaughan, Mike Caveney, Roberto Giobbi, The Davenports, our host Magic Christian and many others has been a reverent and rewarding experience!

<<>>>

Now if this blog were more tabloid style, I could yell out headlines like these:

Dutch Magician Decapitates Rabbit!
Renowned Book Collector Considered Buying A Buried Witch‘s Bones!
Famous U.S. Collector May Bring His Treasures Back Into Barnes and Attics!

 

But of course I won’t. Fortunately, I am more of the serious and responsible writing kind! However, I have no intention of giving a full and thorough review of the conference; I was there to listen, learn, and discuss. So what follows are just some facts, highlights and side notes from my very personal point of view.

For the full program and abstracts of all lectures, have a look here. For the details and the laughs you simply had to be there–sorry! But as a glimpse into the program will reveal, the diverse agenda catered to almost every field of interest: biographical notes and details on some performers and venues; books old and new and how to study them; collectors’ items; some case studies (on a gruesome illusion, a fake automaton, a famous painting, and an early trick deck from 1623), and two topics on magicians serving in wartime and political crisis.

<<>>>

Wien11_Hofzinser_MC

Shortly before the conference, Magic Christian had already announced a major surprise: the resurfacing of a fine and known Hofzinser portrait, painted by Johann Matthäus Aigner in 1846, that had been missing for almost a century. Christian had been looking for it for 25 years, mainly in museums and other collections. Then, only weeks ago, he received a phone call from a lady who offered him to acquire this huge portrait from an estate. It had in fact been hanging in a private home in Gmunden for the last 100 years! Proudly, Christian unveiled it and presented it to the participants, who were duly impressed!

<<>>>

Wien9_Flip

I must say I enjoyed all the talks, as diverse as they were in terms of topic, material, and presentation, but I took the most fresh knowledge and inspiration from these contributions:

Flip tracing the history of the “Decapitation Illusion”, as always with an abundance of pictures and information, and also with a word of criticism on the “trivialized” versions like “Forgetful Freddie” and the “Armcutter”. To prove his point, he successfully (non)decapitated a toy rabbit.

James and Sage Hagy with a vivid description of the magicians present (including Houdini) and their tricks at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. They very graciously handed out free copies of a beautiful little book they had prepared along their topic.

Steffen Taut shared some amazingly enlarged pictures (look here, zoom in and marvel!) and recent scientific methods to (re)assess the paintings of Jheronimus Bosch (correctly pronounced “Boss”), and he added some interesting new hypotheses on a number of details, symbols, and meanings of “The Juggler.” He concluded that there may have been an original version of this famous painting; the one we know and admire, however, was more likely painted “only” in his workshop or by a follower, but not by Bosch himself.

Francois Bost presented some exciting new findings from his own long-standing research on Robert-Houdin‘s political mission to Algiers in 1856, including a heretofore unknown letter from RH to Colonel de Neveu (who had won him for the trip). He concluded that RH had in fact played to a selected, peaceful audience of civil servants (instead of fierce, hostile Marabouts) and that the mission had caused little impact (although it was boosted by the press and RH himself), but had probably served as an early military attempt to test psychological warfare on a people with the help of a renowned magician! (This topics tied in nicely with my own presentation on magic and warfare.)

Ron Bertolla deserves our special appreciation for introducing us to French juggler-turned-creator Alain Cabooter and his wonderful (fake) automaton, “Ioni, The Magical Gymnast” (see below). Not only did he show a truly magical video presentation of Ioni’s astonishing feats at the horizontal bar, which caused thunderous applause; he also brought the treasured figure (now defunct) with their current owners to Vienna and handed out a free booklet with the full (and unhappy) story. Wow!

Wien8_Ioni

Again, I can’t help but marvel at the incredibly rich and diverse history of magic, its ingenious creators and performers, and its myriad links to other arts or historical events!

<<>>>

Wien14_Hotel

The Venue

The EMHC Conference was held at the Hotel Stefanie, Vienna‘s oldest hotel, and their service team supplied us unobtrusively with a never-ending stream of tasty food, snacks, and drinks.

<<>>>

Wien13_Marchfelderhof

Evening Entertainment…

…included a musical and magical dinner at Marchfelderhof on Thursday. When our bus arrived there, we were greeted and treated by the owner and his team with music and flags. Inside, the fine and fun restaurant is ridiculously but charmingly loaded with thousands of  items—lamps, musical instruments, pictures, signed photographs, figurines and what not (see below). As some collector‘s spouse suspiciously opined, the trip was probably taken to demonstrate „that other collectors put much more stuff in their rooms, see, Honey?“

The magic between courses was provided by Magic Christian, Flo Mayer and Wolfgang Moser.

Wien12_Marchf

<<>>>

Friday evening was spent three stories down below city level in the very old Zwölf Apostelkeller, with traditional Viennese food and some fine strolling magic performed by Robert Woitsch and Raphael Macho.

<<>>>

Wien2_RathausAufgang

Wien6_RathausEmpfang

Wien5_RathausLeuchter

Saturday afternoon saw us walking over to Vienna‘s huge and impressive City Hall (with 1,575 rooms, as a plaque said). After a formal reception at the invitation of the Mayor and Governor of Vienna, Dr. Michael Ludwig, we were ushered into the City Council where we marveled at the splendor of the enormous flambeau above us and soon took over the green felt tables. Reinhard Müller was the first to have the cards out. Soon after, Magic Christian performed an Ace routine (with a fine Graziadei subtlety) on this parliamentary stage where, on other days, more subtle deceptive maneuvers may be executed.

Wien4_Karten_RM

Wien3_Karten_MC

Before attacking another buffet, we were treated with a magic show of one piece each by Robert Woitsch, Mark Albert, Wolfgang Moser and Flo Mayer. With the exception of Wolfgang Moser, all featured performers over those three days hail from the Magischer Club Wien, of which Magic Christian is the President.

<<>>>

Wien10_Koffer

What about the Future?

The conference closed on Sunday noon with an interesting talk on the future of magic collections, how to maintain them, and all owners’ responsibility to take care of their treasures and their knowledge in due time so collections neither get thrown away, nor scattered all over the world, nor disappear in obscure museums, but rather remain within the magic community and “the big river” from which the next generation of collectors may fish.

A second topic was how to get younger magic fellows interested in the old books and tricks of our art and how to facilitate their entry into the fields of history and collecting. (I might write more about these topics in a future post.)

<<>>>

Next European Magic & History Conferences:

At least, the immediate future is safe and secured: The participants confirmed to have the next meeting in London in September 2021, organized by Fergus Roy, who already announced some exciting highlights, including a look into a rather unknown collection of 1 million (!) posters. The 2023 Conference is scheduled to be held in Gent, Belgium then.

<<>>>

New Book Department:

November will see the publication of the coming Bible of Bookplates (please excuse the trivialized secular term, but the alliteration was too tempting) by the late Jim Alfredson and Bernhard Schmitz. About six years in the making, Bernhard and the sic! Verlag are currently putting the final touches on the book, which will present about 1,200 magic bookplates that have been identified yet! If you want your bookplate to be included also, make sure to send it to Bernhard before October 1st!

Birgit Bartl-Engelhardt and Wittus Witt will bring out a quick encore and addition to the beautiful Zauber-Bartl Chronology (in German) that was presented to the market just last week. This one will trace the story of the „Zauberkönig“ magic dealers family, to which Rosa Bartl also belonged. (Accompanying his conference presentation, Wittus also has a lovely small book out that features about 300 magic lapel pins. It comes both with an English and a German text.)

And finally, after about 40 (!) years in the making, Volker Huber and Christian Theiß have completed the long awaited Bibliography of German Magic Books until 1945, covering some 3,100 books and booklets on 700 pages. What a monumental achievement! It will most likely set the standard for decades to come. Whether a second volume covering books from 1945 til today will follow is currently unclear, as Christian said. And if so, it might well be a decade or more away. Let’s hope and see–and in the meantime, let’s be happy about and thankful for the first volume before asking for more!

All three books are available for subscription now. Do now what you have to do! 🙂

<<>>>

Wien15_Paddle

Magic coincidence No. 1: A surprising discovery

I may have found an interesting historical magic reference in the cheap decoration of my hotel room. Look at the depiction of that old and grim Japanese warrior above: If it‘s not some sort of fly swat, he may be handling a huge magic paddle! 😉

<<>>>

Wien7_Hexensabbath

Magic coincidence No. 2: A spooky discovery

Taking a stroll after Peter Rawert’s enlightening presentation on books‘ provenance research (a fascinating topic I had never even thought about before), his acquisition of a copy of Reginald Scot‘s seminal work and its link to the alleged witch Ursula Kemp (whose alleged bones he almost ended up buying!), the first shop window I looked at belonged to an art gallery and presented this painting, „Witches‘ Sabbath“ by one Bonaventura Genelli!

<<>>>

Wien1_Denkmal

Magic coincidence No. 3: A weighty discovery

Noticing this statue in the heart of magic Vienna, some of us speculated it could well be our host’s very own one, with MCD meaning “Magic Christian Denkmal” (in German) or MCM meaning “Magic Christian Memorial,” erected by his grateful admirers and disciples… 😉

<<>>>

Jokes aside, we can only conclude by thanking and applauding Magic Christian once more for being such a very gracious and caring host who offered us over four days a cornucopia of magic history, both from our field and from the wonderful city of Vienna!

<<>>>

More Magic in Vienna:

While being there, you may also want to check out the Museum der Illusionen (Museum of Illusions; I guess you figured that one out) with its fine optical illusions.

And in line with it, there’s currently a dazzling exhibition (until 26 October, 2019) at the mumok museum, Vertigo. Op Art and a History of Deception 1520–1970.”

(Jan Isenbart)


Addendum 29.08.2019

And here’s a full review of the conference by Ian Keable of the UK, who had presented a lecture on the four magicians in Charles Dickens’s life.


 

Congrats on 1,000 Episodes of MagicWeek!

magicweek1000

Huge congrats to magic fellow Duncan Trillo from the UK for completing the first 1,000 episodes of his MagicWeek news service, which is published (you guessed it) every Saturday. What a monster job, week after week since 1st July 2000!

Even though the news are heavily UK-oriented, I stop by often and usually find an interesting link or two to pursue. If you haven’t tried it yet, I do recommend you check out the site. But if you already are an avid reader, why don’t you give Duncan a shout on this occasion and send him a note of appreciation for his constant, tireless support?!

I’m afraid we tend to take these things for granted too easily (in magic as well as elsewhere in life). And if you are not familiar with editorial work under the pressure of daily, weekly or monthly deadlines (which most people aren’t; I am), it’s easy to misjudge the huge and time-consuming effort behind digging up, checking, compiling and editing “a couple of online news bits” here or “just some magazine articles” there.

Actually, I think I should put together a list of my personal “Magic Heroes of the Internet” soon. Duncan Trillo will certainly be on it. Please keep up the great work!


 

More on Magic and Art

In recent weeks, I have expanded the MAGIC ART section on this site a bit. New entries feature the wonderful and diverse talents of artists–many of them also magicians–like Jonathan Allen, Tango Gao, Tommervik, Jay Fortune, Asi Wind, Antonio Cabral, and Vanni Pulé.

Take a look!